Royal College of Emergency Medicine Menu Menu
Research

Research

Information on GCP Training for Emergency Physicians and key documents from the Research and Publications Committee.

GCP training and key documents

Information on GCP Training for Emergency Physicians and key documents from the Research and Publications Committee.

Adults lacking capacity – NRES online toolkit (Oct 2010)

The NRES advice for consent in emergency care research is now published on the NRES website. This is an excellent resource – particularly the FAQ section (find this by clicking the ‘movie camera’ icon in the bottom right, then on the expanded menus click on the ‘paper clip’ icon at the bottom right). The FAQs were collected by the NIHR Injuries and Emergencies National Specialist Group from I&E researchers around the UK, so they address real world problems.

Training in Good Clinical Practice for Medicine Research

Training in Good Clinical Practice for medical research (GCP) is required for everyone who is taking any part in medical research.

The 2021 RCEM Curriculum requires evidence of active participation in research, including recruitment to clinical trials, throughout training. EM trainees are therefore encouraged to complete GCP training as early as possible on their training schemes and maintain certification until completion of training.

The previous RCEM GCP training package is now no longer recognised or accepted by many sponsors, and we are now suggesting that RCEM members complete the NIHR GCP training available here. This is the same certification required to continue involvement in research as a consultant.

The website will guide you through registering with NHS Learn or alternatively if you already have an NHS Learn account you can login directly .

You then have a choice of completing either the ‘Introduction To Good Clinical Practice (GCP) ELearning’ (if you haven’t previously completed the course) or the ‘Good Clinical Practice (GCP) Refresher ELearning’. Your NIHR GCP certificate is valid for 2 years (as opposed to a year with the previous RCEM GCP training package) and in future you can recertify through the Refresher module.

Note that for some research studies it may be possible to complete a study-specific GCP (e.g. the Recovery trial) rather than the full NIHR GCP training package. However, if you have a valid NIHR GCP certificate, it will cover you for all research studies. For those of you with existing RCEM GCP training certificates, these will remain valid until 1 August 2022, although sponsors may require additional NIHR GCP certification.

Top Research Priorities in Emergency Medicine

RCEM, in partnership with the James Lind Alliance (JLA), has conducted a Research Priority Setting Partnership with the aim of including patients, carers and clinicians in a process to establish the top research priorities in emergency medicine. Please see the Research Priority Setting Partnership section below.

RCEM Research Strategy 2020

Technical Guide

Will give you the details of different research methodologies as applied to emergency medicine and tell you how to manage the project itself.

How to run a research project

Will take you through each stage of an emergency medicine research project, giving advice on what you have to do to make each stage as painless as possible.

Why do Research?

Motivate yourself with these tips.

Writing a Research Proposal

  • Step-by-step suggestions for writing your research project
  • Submit your best research to Emergency Medicine Journal and receive the following benefits
  • As the official journal of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine, journal content is distributed to a targeted audience
  • Fast Editorial Turnaround- 24 days from submission to first decision and 17 days from acceptance to online publication
  • High visibility across bmj.com
  • With an international editorial board and Editorial Advisory Board, a diverse scope and an Impact Factor of 1.776*, Emergency Medicine Journal is the ideal outlet to submit your best research. 

Getting Started

A guide for those of you with little research experience to help get your thoughts together and point out some common pitfalls for you to avoid. Click on the below to expand the content and read our useful guidance on getting started with a research project.

+ Why do research?

There are a large number of reasons why you want to do a research project. A good research project is always much more work and much harder than you initially think, it is therefore worth looking at your motives right at the beginning.

If you have been told that you have to do research or feel that you have to get some research published to pad out your CV you are unlikely to successfully complete a project (and it would be worth discussing with your trainers whether learning about critical appraisal and audit would be a better use of your time).

Remember that starting but failing to complete a project may look worse than not doing any research at all (especially as there are alternative academic areas in which you could show excellence, such as audit or BETS). However, if you motivation is a desire to know the answer to a burning question, a desire to take on the intellectual challenge of academic methods or a fascination with a particular part of Emergency Medicine – read on!

What do you want to achieve?
Be realistic about what you might achieve. For trainees the goal of your first research project (and probably the next few as well!) will be to learn about academic methods, rather than to produce information that will change the future of Emergency Medicine. At this early stage your research may be a success (in terms of your academic development), even if it does not get accepted for publication. You should bear in mind that the primary endpoint should be your personal development, however there is a satisfaction at also becoming expert in a particular field, producing original information and learning self-motivated work.

As you develop your skills in academic methods your objectives will change, and as the quality of your research improves you will start to answer larger and probably more important questions. Like anything else in medicine acquiring these skills takes time and practice.

Research and Academic Careers

Very few Emergency Medicine trainees will be intending to follow a academic career, most will become full-time NHS Consultants.

However it is not only academics that produce excellent research! A career is an awfully long time, and we all need stimulation to maintain our interest in our work. For some, research provides this additional interest. However, fitting good research into a busy NHS Career can be difficult. If you are planning to do this learning about research methodology is a good idea. Those in an academic career may have more time for research, but have additional pressure from teaching, university administration and their honorary NHS commitments.

If you are contemplating a career in academic emergency medicine talk to those who are already embarked on this pathway at an early stage (and make sure that you know a good psychiatrist!).

Initial planning

This section is intended for those of you who have not had much experience at running a research project. It is very, very , very (is this enough ‘very’?) important to adopt a structured approach from the beginning and get expert advice early on. This sounds simple and obvious – but you would be amazed at how many people ignore this advice in their enthusiasm to rush to designing a data collection sheet!

If you ignore this advice your project will fail – it is as simple as that.

The Structured Approach

A successful research project requires a structured and disciplined approach. There are a series of stages to go through. These have to be done in the right order – it may not be immediately obvious to you why this has to be done, and it may seem like a waste of time to give so much attention to the details of working out the question, the exact methods and the way that the data will be analysed before actually collecting data. However, if you follow this advice you are much more likely to actually complete a successful project.

This advice comes from people who have made the mistakes (see) so it is well worth following. You should have planned all stages of your project, including the analysis and presentation of results before starting data collection (as data collection comes fairly late on in the Structured Approach to research). Planning may include the collection of some pilot data. It is often a good idea to write up the project before you start data collection! This may sound odd – but it is the best way of making sure that you have undertaken a structured approach (writing a research grant application has the same effect).

First write the Introduction (for which you will need to do a literature search and formulate the research question), then write the Methods (being specific about all aspects of the research), then write the Results, leaving gaps to be filled in when you have collected the data (this will make you think about data analysis and presentation). All of this needs to be done before any data is collected!

+ Why research projects fail

There are a number of recurrent themes that come up when we look at why Emergency Medicine research projects fail. Projects rarely fail due to the underlying idea being bad – most failures are due to not having a structured approach, poor supervision or poor motivation.

+ How to run a research project

A successful research project requires a structured and disciplined approach. There are a series of stages to go through. These have to be done in the right order – it may not be immediately obvious to you why this has to be done, and it may seem like a waste of time to give so much attention to the details of working out the question, the exact methods and the way that the data will be analysed before actually collecting data.

However, if you follow this advice you are much more likely to actually complete a successful project. This advice comes from people who have made the mistakes so it is well worth following. You should have planned all stages of your project, including the analysis and presentation of results before starting data collection (as data collection comes fairly late on in the structured approach to research).

Planning may include the collection of some pilot data. It is often a good idea to write up the project before you start data collection! This may sound odd – but it is the best way of making sure that you have undertaken a structured approach (writing a research grant application has the same effect). First write the Introduction (for which you will need to do a literature search and formulate the research question), then write the Methods (being specific about all aspects of the research), then write the Results, leaving gaps to be filled in when you have collected the data (this will make you think about data analysis and presentation). All of this needs to be done before any data is collected!

Planning your Project

When starting to think about your project there are 10 things that you should consider from the beginning:

1. Define your research question
Research should be driven by the need to answer a question. The question should be well-defined, important and relevant. Having a well-defined question will help guide you through the many methodological problems that lie ahead. Issues such as who to study, what intervention to study, and what outcomes to measure should be determined by the research question. See our document – Defining and refining your research question.

2. Make sure your idea is original
If your idea is a good one someone else may already have thought of it. Do a reasonably thorough literature review using Medline and the Cochrane database. Also, check the National Research Register for work in progress. If someone has already investigated your idea, don’t necessarily give up. A lot of research is flawed or irrelevant to local or emergency practice. Maybe you can do it better or in a more relevant setting?

3. Draw up a research proposal
Use your well-defined research question to guide you and our document Writing a research proposal to help you. Writing a proposal is a good way of working out what difficulties you will face before they arrive.

4. Decide what methodology you should use
Your choice of method should be determined by your research question, not vice-versa. A basic introduction to the various types of research methods is available on this website. Work out what type of question you are asking and then look at the relevant document.

5. Find out what skills you will need
Research is a professional business, you need to know what you are doing if you hope to be successful. Skills can be acquired from many sources, but there is no substitute for talking to someone who has been there before. This website has some basic resources aimed at helping you to communicate effectively with experienced researchers. Use them to develop your idea and write your proposal.

6. Work out what resources you will need
All research consumes resources. Mostly it consumes your time and energy. Do not assume that either are boundless and use them wisely. Plan your project carefully then double all your estimates of the time each stage will take. Estimate your sample size and plan recruitment. Acquiring major research funding is a difficult business, but many smaller grants go unused. Ask your research office or look at our sources for funding.

7. Work out what help you will need
Doing research on your own is hard work. You can easily make mistakes without realising. Formal research supervision is the best option but very difficult to come by. Hospital and health authority research offices will be able to point you towards taught courses and the resources to fund them. University departments of epidemiology, statistics and health economics can often give up to an hour of advice without charge. Contact experienced researchers in emergency medicine or related specialities. Whatever you do, make sure you have a well-defined idea, have searched the literature and have at least attempted to write a protocol before you seek help.

8. Get ethics committee approval
Always consider the need for ethics committee approval. Even retrospective case note review carries issues of consent and confidentiality. Projects that do not directly involve patient contact (e.g. case note review) will usually be approved by Chairman’s action, without full committee review. Any project involving patient contact, even to simply complete a questionnaire, will require ethics committee approval. See our document on How to get ethics committee approval.

9. Establish proper research governance
Things can go wrong in research- adverse events can occur, data may be lost, patients or staff may complain or results may be flawed. Just as with clinical practice, make sure you have the skills to manage your project, the supervision you require and everyone understands who will carry the can if it all goes pear-shaped. Ensure that you know what you are responsible for and who you are accountable to. See the Department of Health guidance on research governance.

10. Pilot or die
No matter how carefully you have planned your research you will almost certainly have overlooked something. The only way to find out is to get out there and start doing your research – and then stop before you waste too much time. Analyse the data you have collected so far. You will almost certainly find out something very important that you wish to change in your protocol. Nobody ever regrets pilot work.

+ A technical guide for more experienced researchers

There are a number of websites that give information about research methodology. These pages aim to point out specific aspects that are particular relevant to emergency medicine research and to give you links to articles that we think are worth reading. However, although reading about specific methodologies is important, it is also vital for you to get advice from someone who is experienced in research using that particular methodology.

+ Helpful resources and further reading

There is a large amount of information and a large number of sources of knowledge and advice about research methods, many of which are now on the Internet. These pages link the College web site to other sources of information and provide a list of further reading.

+ Conducting a survey

Read our quick guide on conducting surveys.

Resources

These pages list a variety of web based resources that may be helpful in developing your research project. Many are cited in the supporting documents to this site. Web based resources are constantly changing and many new resources appear. Please let us know of any useful resources that you find. Please let us know if the links no longer work.

+ General + Statistics + Databases + Ethics

Health Research Authority (previously Department of Health Central Office for Research Ethics Committes – COREC).
MRC guidance on good research conduct (ethics)
National Research Ethics Service (NRES)

+ Research Governance + Writing & submitting a paper + Academic Career Advice

Academic Careers Advice – Academy of Medical Sciences – Ensuring a first class workforce
Click here to read our Academic EM guide.
Doing research
MRC – Explore your career options interactive map
Wellcome Career Development Programmes

+ Funding Information + Journals + Courses

Taught courses in research methods vary from one day courses providing an introduction to statistics or qualitative methods, to Masters degree courses in Health Services Research. These courses usually cover quantitative and qualitative design and analysis, health economics, epidemiology and statistics, systematic reviews and critical appraisal. They provide a good general grounding in research methods for anyone interested in pursuing an academic career.

London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine
Masters courses in Epidemiology or Health Services/Systems Research. The Masters in Epidemiology is available by distance learning.

Bristol University Department of Social Medicine
Short courses (2 to 5 days) in research methods, statistics, health economics and qualitative research.

University College London Research Methods for Health Professional
One year course in quantitative and qualitative research methods aimed at junior doctors.

The Masters in Health Services Research– takes one year full-time or two years part-time.

University of Leeds – the MA in Health Service Studies (Research) is a one year full-time, or two years part-time, Masters course in health services research methods.

+ Textbooks

Research in Health Care. Crombie I K & Davies H T O. John Wiley and sons.
An excellent introduction to research methodology. Well worth reading before you commence any research project.

Clinical Epidemiology: A Basic Science for Clinical Medicine. Sackett D L, Haynes R B, Guyatt, G H & Tugwell P. Little, Brown and Company.
The ‘bible’ of evidence based medicine. A good way to ensure your research is favourably appraised is to understand critical appraisal before you start.

Epidemiology in Medicine. Hennekens CH, Buring JE. Little, Brown and Co.
Basic epidemiological principals lie behind a proper understanding of research methods. This is a good, readable book to remind/familiarize you with the key issues.

Methods for the Economic Evaluation of Health Care Programmes. Drummond M F, O’Brien B, Stoddart G L & Torrance G W. Oxford Medical Publications.
Essential reading for anyone contemplating an economic evaluation. Also useful if you want to understand what health economists are talking about.

Randomised controlled trials. Jadad A. BMJ Books.
A very readable book covering the key issues that need to be considered by anyone undertaking, or wishing to understand, a randomised controlled trial.

Medical statistics: A Commonsense Approach. Campbell M J & Machin D. John Wiley and sons.
Statistics are sometimes seen as just a p value and a funny sounding test that gives credibility to your study. This book explains the many valuable ways that an understanding of statistics can improve the validity of your research.

Practical Statistics for Medical Research. Altman D G. Chapman & Hall.
A more detailed statistical text yet starting from an assumption of little statistical knowledge.

Statistics with Confidence. Altman D G, Machin D, Bryant T N & Gardner M J. BMJ Books.
Medical journals are encouraging researchers to move away from hypothesis testing, with p values, and towards estimation, with confidence intervals. This book provides the explanations and simplifies the process by including some simple to use computer software.

Health Services Research Methods: A Guide to Best Practice. Black N, Brazier J, Fitzpatrick R & Reeves B (Eds.) BMJ Books.
An advanced text relating to recent advances in research methodology.

How to Write a Paper. Hall G M (Ed.). BMJ Books.
Written by a variety of authors who have published research or been involved in the editorial process. Even if you don’t agree with what they say, you would be wise to take note if you want your research to be published.

Qualitative Research in Health Care. Mays N & Pope C. BMJ Books.
A concise introduction to qualitative research containing papers originally published in the BMJ.

Research Grants

Research grants

Applications are invited from all College members and fellows for the Autumn 2021 RCEM Research Grants.

Grant application forms can be downloaded from here and a guidance document found here. For advice on writing a grant application see www.mrc.ac.uk and the following headings should be used:

  • Introduction – what is already known in this area
  • Research Question – usually as a 3 or 4 part question
  • Methods – including sample size calculation if relevant, how the statistical analysis of results will be performed and a timeline for the project
  • Project Budget Sheet – details of exact costs of proposed project
  • Project timeline – a detailed plan
  • Reasons for support requested – include importance of the question to Emergency Medicine, and future potential of the work for attracting further research funding.

Applications will be rated according to the quality of science, the relevance to Emergency Medicine, the potential for academic development of the lead applicant, deliverability and the likelihood that the work will lead to future research funding.

Successful applicants will be expected to produce a short report in the approved format on the progress of the project every 12 months and may also be invited to present their work at the RCEM Annual Scientific Conference.

Applications are particularly welcome from trainees, specialty doctors, consultants within 5 years of CCT and consultants without an established research background who wish to develop an academic portfolio.

The lead applicant must a member or fellow of the College. A team-based approach with strong EM leadership is encouraged. Appropriate commercial and non-commercial partnerships are welcome.

These grants are potentially eligible for inclusion on the UKCRN Portfolio and for support from your local clinical research network. Preference will be given to applicants who submit projects likely to lead to UKCRN Portfolio adoption.

Applications are particularly welcome themed around the RCEM Top 30 Research priorities in conjunction with the James Lind Alliance.

Please send your application along with a copy of your CV to the College office or via email to Theo.Chiles@rcem.ac.uk

Deadline: 5pm 7 March 2022

For further information regarding the application process please contact:
Theo Chiles, RCEM research committee administration email: Theo.Chiles@rcem.ac.uk
Matt Reed, RCEM Professor, email: matthew.reed@nhslothian.scot.nhs.uk

RCEM Research Grants for Low Income countries – applications closed

Applications were invited for RCEM grants to undertake emergency medicine research in low income countries. The RCEM encourages applications up to £5,000 for a research application focussed on improving the delivery of emergency medicine in low income countries. Applicants must:

  1. Be practising emergency medicine in a low-income country
  2. Show collaboration on the project with a member or fellow of the UK College of Emergency Medicine who should also be a co-applicant

For advice on writing a grant application see mrc.ukri.org/

The following headings should be used:

Purpose and Background – what is already known in this area and an outline of the value the research will bring to emergency medicine.

A Plan of investigation which should include:

  • Research Question – usually as a 3 or 4 part question
  • Methods – including sample size calculation if relevant, how the statistical analysis of results will be performed and a timeline for the project.
  • Project Budget Sheet – details of exact costs of proposed project
  • Project timeline – a detailed plan
  • Dissemination – an outline of how the research findings will be disseminated to inform clinical practice and service delivery
  • Reasons for support requested – include importance of the question to Emergency Medicine, and future potential of the work for attracting further research funding.

Applications are rated according to the quality of science, the importance of the underlying research program, the strength and value of the collaboration with Members and Fellows of the College of Emergency Medicine. Due regard is given to the relative wealth of the country or countries in which the research will be carried out and the findings acted upon. Successful applicants are expected to produce a short report in the approved format on the progress of the project every 12 months, and may also be invited to present the findings of the study at our Annual Scientific Conference.

The 2021 grant is now closed to applications. 

For further information about the grant please contact:

Alasdair Gray, Professor of Emergency Medicine on behalf of the Research Committee, Royal College of Emergency Medicine
Edinburgh Emergency Medicine
Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh
51 Little France Crescent
Edinburgh, EH16 4SA

alasdair.gray@ed.ac.uk

How to win an RCEM grant

Doctoral Research Fellowship 2021

The Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM) is launching the next round of the RCEM PhD Fellowship Scheme. Applications are invited from trainees in Emergency Medicine (EM) from CT1 and above, who wish to develop academically. The scheme aims to support the development of research capacity to improve emergency health care. This scheme will fund Fellowships to undertake research involving patients, samples or data from patients, people who are not patients, populations, health technology assessment and health services research. The RCEM does not fund research work involving animals and/or animal tissue.

Potential applicants and their host organisations should note that the RCEM PhD Fellowship Scheme is a personal award designed to contribute to an individual’s salary costs (the remainder being provided by the applicant’s supporting consortia) on completion of the PhD research project.

The Doctoral Research Fellowship (RCEM-DRF-Policy) is aimed at individuals of outstanding potential, early in their research careers. It aims to fast-track them through a customised research training programme in an environment reflecting their individual talents and training needs. It is anticipated that successful applicants would become independent research leaders within 6 to 10 years of completing the RCEM-DRF award.

Following completion of a RCEM-DRF, the Fellows are expected to have successfully completed a robust research and training programme and be able to show evidence of:

  • Completion of the research proposed in the application
  • Award of a PhD
  • Completion of a substantial and wide-ranging training element
  • Increased research skills
  • Publications arising from the Fellowship
  • Involvement in collaborative relationships

Evidence of the above will be sought through interim and final report monitoring.

Research projects undertaken as part of a RCEM Fellowship will be included on the NIHR portfolio. Local Research Design Service (RDS) support should be available for all NIHR portfolio project research proposals.

Eligibility

  1. Applicants for a RCEM-DRF must be able to demonstrate that they have previous research experience. For example, a Masters qualification would be an indicator of such experience.
  2. Applicants must be medically qualified and a trainee in EM.
  3. The RCEM-DRFs are intended to fund individuals to undertake a PhD. Applicants who have already begun a programme of work to achieve a research doctorate are eligible to apply as long as, by the date that they intend to take up a DRF, they have not been registered for a PhD (or MPhil with transfer to PhD) for more than 12 months WTE.
  4. Only one application to the RCEM Fellowship Scheme is permitted in each round. Multiple applications will not be accepted.

Scope

  1. The Fellowships may be undertaken on a full-time or part-time basis. Full-time Fellowships are available to undertake research for 3 years at 100% WTE. In order to provide an opportunity for talented individuals who, for personal reasons, are unable to undertake full-time research, the Fellowship will be made available for 4 or 5 years part-time (i.e. 75% or 60% WTE). The RCEM is not able to fund awards of any other duration or profile.
  2. The RCEM award will contribute £25,000 per year (total £75,000 over 3 years) towards:

A. Directly Incurred Costs

  • The applicant’s salary including the employer’s contribution to National Insurance and superannuation (proportion funded 100%).
  • A training & development programme appropriate for a Doctoral research fellowship (proportion funded 100%).

B. For NHS Organisations

RCEM awards will be eligible for inclusion on the NIHR portfolio and for CLRN funding. This training scheme is recognised by the NIHR Dean for Training.

The Fellowship does not include, or pay for, any activities other than the research and training proposed in a successful application.

The remaining costs of the PhD fellowship must be met by a consortia which can include Deaneries, Universities, NHS Trusts and Comprehensive Research Networks. See section 8.

Application Procedure

Fellowships will be awarded based on open competition. Applications must be received by Friday 22 January 2021; interviews will be held in late January / early February 2021.

All documents must be submitted in English.

Fellowships should begin between February and September 2021 and cannot normally be deferred.

Timetable

30 November 2020 – Advert open
22 January 2021 – Closing date (17:00) for submissions
25 January 2021 (W/C) – Shortlisting by Panel
January/February 2021 – Interviews and decision to award (date TBC)
September 2021 – Latest date to begin award

Applicants are asked to keep the interview dates available to attend for interview in London.

Please send your application along with a copy of your CV to theo.chiles@rcem.ac.uk by 17:00 Friday 22 January 2021.

Trainee Emergency Research Network (TERN) Fellowship 2021

(Application deadline 14 January 2022)

The Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM) is launching the second round of the RCEM TERN Fellowship scheme. This scheme will fund 50% of the successful applicant’s time over a two year period subject to progress.

Applications are invited from trainees or clinical fellows in Emergency Medicine at ≥ST3 level or equivalent who wish to develop this exciting project, with academic support and mentorship from the previous TERN fellow, college professors and the RCEM research committee.

TERN aims to improve research opportunity for all trainees, advanced practitioners and fellows in emergency medicine by facilitating multicentre research projects selected and designed by trainees. Such networks have been hugely successful in the allied specialties of anaesthesia, neurosurgery and general surgery leading to increased research awareness, improved academic training, co-authored publications and changes to clinical practice 1-3. Network projects present a strong opportunity for both academic and non-academic trainees to engage with national research, thus maximising output and impact from non-clinical time.  Although still a relatively new network, TERN has already delivered several trainee conceived and designed national portfolio-adopted projects across over a hundred UK sites; successfully collaborated with Australasian colleagues to deliver an international headache project; secured NIHR partner funding for a 2022 research study on a JLA priority topic; and has published a number of articles on our work.

This fellowship scheme supports TERN through dedicated funding to support project development, co-ordination and delivery. Academic mentorship for the project and fellowship will be provided throughout the post by the RCEM Professors and local supervisors. Assistance with infrastructure, meeting rooms, communications and networking will be provided through use of the RCEM facilities and a modest dedicated budget line.

This scheme is an ideal opportunity for those who have a desire to engage with academic emergency medicine and consider development of a portfolio career. The role will offer significant exposure to project development and delivery, including liaison with research design services, ethics committees, research and development services and use of the IRAS platform. Previous research experience in these areas would be advantageous, but is not essential. Applicants could take up this role either on a Less than Full Time training basis, or as a dedicated and prearranged OOPFR placement.

Potential applicants and their host organisations should note that the RCEM TERN Fellowship Scheme is a personal award designed to contribute 50% of an individual’s base salary costs (the remainder being provided by the applicant’s supporting consortia).

Following completion of the Fellowship, the successful applicant is expected to have designed and delivered at least one clinical research study through the national TERN network, and significantly enhanced the visibility and co-ordination of TERN. Additional goals considered may include the following:

  • Educational plan for raised awareness of academic opportunity and engagement options for emergency medicine trainees.
  • Close working with RCEM learning to support development of the research page
  • Development of stakeholder lists and Involvement in collaborative relationships
  • Peer reviewed publication of completed projects arising from the fellowship, and presentation of key findings at RCEM meetings, e.g. the Annual Scientific Conference and Academic Trainees Day.
  • Bespoke training plan including a potential higher research qualification such as a M.Sc program, Masters in Public Health or modular training in clinical trial design.

Evidence of the above will be sought through interim and final report monitoring. Support for formal research training will be considered during the fellowship in line with individual commitment and career trajectory.

Research projects undertaken as part of TERN will be included on the NIHR portfolio. Local Research Design Services (RDS) http://www.nihr.ac.uk/infrastructure  support all NIHR portfolio project research proposals. In addition, NIHR portfolio adoption will facilitate the engagement of clinical research nursing teams based in every hospital to assist with data collection, research governance and oversight.

Eligibility

  1. Applicants for a TERN fellowship must be able to demonstrate that they have previous experience of project leadership and delivery.
  2. Applicants should have experience of committee working, including organisation, identification and delivery of established objectives.
  3. Applicants must be medically qualified and a trainee in Emergency medicine
  4. TERN fellowships are intended to fund individuals for 50% dedicated project time alongside a clinical emergency medicine work program.  Applicants who will be receiving any external fellowship funding and/or participating in a programme of fellowship work from August 2022 to 2024 (medical doctorate, academic clinical lectureship, educational fellow, leadership fellow etc..) are not eligible to apply.
  5. Only one application to the RCEM Fellowship Scheme is permitted in each round. Multiple applications will not be accepted.

Scope

  1. The Fellowship is designed to be undertaken on a 50% part-time basis, alongside clinical work in higher specialist training, or as part of an OOPFR placement. The RCEM is not able to fund awards of any other duration or profile.
  2. The RCEM award will contribute 50% base salary costs over a 2 year period. The award will not fund additional costs such as those occurring through reduced out of hours (OOH) work; it is envisaged that those applying will maintain OOH clinical work in order to continue receiving their full banding entitlement.
  3. The Fellowship does not include, or pay for, any activities other than the salary costs covering research, academic training and travel expenses proposed in a successful application. All clinical study leave, professional leave and additional expenses will fall within the remit of the employing host organisation or deanery.
  1. It is an expectation that RCEM awards will be on the NIHR portfolio and thus eligible for CRN infrastructure and nursing support. This eligibility will also facilitate access to advanced research training at the discretion of the applicant and supervisor.

Application Procedure

Fellowships will be made based on open competition. A single fellowship is offered in this round.

Applications must be received by 14th January 2022; interviews will be held towards the beginning of February following peer review and scoring. The successful applicant is expected to commence the post from August 2022.

All documents must be submitted in English.

Timetable

09th NOVEMBER 2021               Advert open

14th JANUARY 2022                  Closing date (17:00) for submissions

17th JANUARY 2022 (W/C)        Shortlisting by Panel

FEBRUARY 2022                       Interviews and decision to award (date TBC)

AUGUST 2022                          Post commences

Interviews will be held in London at College buildings. Successfully shortlisted applicants will be notified as soon as feasible

To apply, please send your CV with a covering letter highlighting how you meet the essential and desirable criteria for the post to theo.chiles@rcem.ac.uk by 17:00 Friday 14th January 2022

References:

  1. Chari A, Jamjoom AA, Edlmann E, et al. The British Neurosurgical Trainee Research Collaborative: Five years on. Acta Neurochir (Wien) 2018; 160(1): 23-8.
  2. Jamjoom AA, Phan PN, Hutchinson PJ, Kolias AG. Surgical trainee research collaboratives in the UK: an observational study of research activity and publication productivity. BMJ Open 2016; 6(2): e010374.
  3. Kolias AG, Cowie CJ, Tarnaris A, Hutchinson PJ, Brennan PM, British Neurosurgical Trainee Research C. Ensuring a bright future for clinical research in surgery with trainee led research networks. BMJ 2013; 347: f5225.

(i) Essential Criteria

Criterion Assessed by
Current appointment as a trainee or clinical fellow in Emergency Medicine in UK or Republic of Ireland (RofI). CV /College Data
Commitment to the specialty of Emergency Medicine, demonstrated through career path, continuing professional development and examination. CV
Enthusiasm for project development and delivery CV +/- interview
Evidence of sustainability planning for the duration of the project (Out of program time prearranged, or trust clinical fellow role secured) * CV +/- interview
  • Desirable Criteria
Criterion Assessed by
Previous relevant committee experience, either through RCEM or EMTA CV +/- interview
Critical Appraisal Examination training, and/or success by examination CV
Higher qualification in research or education (MSc or equivalent) CV
Familiarity with social-media based communication, engagement and knowledge translation strategies CV +/- interview
Evidence of team co-ordination and leadership within clinical role, organisational role within trust or external role CV +/- interview
Evidence of prior academic writing (through publication, presentation, abstract writing, blog posting or local project) CV +/- interview
Evidence of national trainee liaison roles CV +/- interview
Evidence of previous research engagement or activity (such as research governance training, good clinical practice training and/or formal research design/delivery) CV +/- interview

 * A letter signed by the applicant’s Educational Supervisor and local training program director should be provided in support of these criteria where relevant.

Surveys

RCEM surveys on specific issues can be found on this page. Surveys from other organisations can be published here with the approval of the College Executive. If you would like your survey to be advertised here, please read this guidance and e-mail your request to theo.chiles@rcem.ac.uk

Currently running surveys The survey can be completed here:

Computer Assisted Diagnosis in the Acute Setting: The Emergency Physician’s View

This survey explores the views and anxieties of senior ED physicians about computer assisted diagnosis, robotic telemedicine & automated diagnosis in EDs. It is hoped that it will contribute to the development of safe technological platforms in the complex environment of the emergency department.

The survey can be completed here.

James Lind Alliance Priority Setting Partnership

Updated: 23 January 2017

Top 10 research priorities

Introduction

The Royal College of Emergency Medicine, in partnership with the James Lind Alliance (JLA), has conducted a Research Priority Setting Partnership from September 2015 to January 2017 with the aim of including patients, carers and clinicians in a process to establish the research priorities in emergency medicine.

We have identifying unanswered research questions within emergency medicine (EM), ranked them in order of priority. The final output from the PSP is a ‘top ten’ of EM research priorities. Jason Smith as College Professor, has lead the process, but wider engagement was sought from clinicians of all levels (including doctors and nurses), patients, carers and the public. Richard Morley, a James Lind Alliance Adviser, acted as the independent chair of the Steering Group, and in this capacity guided the process and ensure fairness and transparency. Sam McIntyre, RCEM’s Quality Manager, ran the project day-to-day.

It has involved over 200 research questions, almost 100 mini-systematic reviews, a long list of 72 questions (which were prioritised by over 500 people), a shortlist of 30, and finally a top 10 research priorities for emergency medicine.

We thank the hundreds of patients, their families, clinicians who work in emergency departments and everyone else who has contributed to this journey. Thank you for sharing your ideas and views with us – together we are shaping the future of emergency medicine.

About the final workshop

The final workshop was held in Manchester on 19 January 2017 and involved patients, the public, clinicians, the James Lind Alliance and RCEM.

At the final workshop we worked in small teams to determine the definitive Top 10 Emergency Medicine research priorities. This was an absolutely fascinating day full of interaction, lively debates, stimulating discussions and brilliant people. We worked together to boil down the top 30 priorities – as voted for by the EM community, healthcare professionals, patients, researchers and the public – to find the top 10.

Workshop objectives

  • To give an overview of the priority setting process and work so far
  • To reflect on and discuss participants’ views of the short list of uncertainties in emergency medicine
  • In small and larger groups to order the short list by priority, noting areas of agreement and disagreement across groups. Together agree the 10 most important uncertainties
  • Consider next steps, so that the uncertainties are taken forward for research funding.

Ways to get involved

  1. Share the Top 10 with your contacts
  2. Get involved in research answering some of the Top 10 questions
  3. Tweet us @JLAEMPSP
  4. For more in depth information you can read our EM PSP Protocol document
  5. Donate to RCEM Fundraising to help fund worthy research and education in EM

Read all about it!

Publications, articles and news stories about the emergency medicine research priority setting partnership:
An Emergency Medicine Research Priority Setting Partnership to establish the top 10 research priorities in emergency medicine – EMJ (4 May 2017)
Here’s the top 10 (and more) research priorities in EM. James Lind & St.Emlyn’s (23 Jan 2017)
Setting research priorities in emergency care – Nursing times (25 Jan 2016)
Emergency Medicine Research Priority Setting Partnership – Cochrane UK
The emergency medicine research priority setting partnership – EMJ (29 Sept 2015)
Emergency Medicine PSP– James Lind Alliance
James Lind and the RCEM needs you (and you, and you) – St.Emlyn’s
Research Priority Setting: The Royal College Of Emergency Medicine, In Partnership With The James Lind Alliance (JLA) – NIHR CLAHRC Yorkshire & Humber
Nurses’ opinions matter and they should be heard: How you can help influence research – Nursing Times (18 Dec 2015)
James Lind and the RCEM needs you (and you, and you). St.Emlyn’s (23 Oct 2015)

Background

The JLA is an organisation supported by the National Institute of Health Research (NIHR) Evaluation, Trials and Studies Coordinating Centre in Southampton, and they bring together clinicians, patients, and other stakeholders in partnership to set research priorities. They aim to identify unanswered questions within a specialty, and rank them in order of priority, with the final output from the PSP being a ‘top ten’ of research priorities for that given area. The advantage of the JLA is that they provide a framework, with a reproducible process, and advisers who guide the process along the way. They are recognised by large grant-awarding bodies as the gold standard in research prioritisation. If you are applying for a research grant, and can map your application to one of the research priorities, then this adds considerable weight to the application. In 2013 a paediatric emergency medicine PSP was undertaken.

Meet the Steering Group

  • Richard Morley – Chair
  • Jason Smith – Clinical Lead
  • Sam McIntyre – Project Officer
  • Justine Amero
  • Simon Carley
  • Douglas Findlay
  • Lynsey Flowerdew
  • Melanie Gager
  • Liza Keating
  • Ben McCullough
  • Hazel McCullough
  • Rachel O’Brien
  • Miranda Odam
  • Ian Roberts
  • Katharine Wylie

Awards & Competitions

The College's Clinical Studies Group runs various awards throughout the year. Details of awards and competitions can be found below, along with details on how to enter.

+ EM Undergraduate Essay Prize 2022

RCEM Emergency Medicine Undergraduate Essay Prizes 2022: Advert

This year RCEM are pleased to announce two categories of prize:

  1. The RCEM Undergraduate Research Essay Prize
  2. The RCEM Undergraduate Quality Improvement Essay Prize

Prizes include:

  • £500
  • Reasonable travel, accommodation and registration fee for the RCEM Scientific Conference 2022
  • One year membership of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine.

Applications are invited for the 2022 Royal College of Emergency Medicine Undergraduate Prizes. Applicants are required to be a medical student at a recognised teaching institution within the UK but are not required to be a member of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine. There will be two prizes awarded and the value of each prize will be £500.

The RCEM Undergraduate Essay Prize winners 2022 will be required to present their work at the RCEM Scientific Conference 2022 which will take place in Belfast from October 4-6th 2022. The prizes will in addition fund the winner’s reasonable travel, accommodation and registration fee for the RCEM Scientific Conference 2022 and a one year membership of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine.

The essays should describe original Emergency Medicine research or quality improvement. This work should not previously have been published in a journal or presented at a major UK/international conference and with a clear applicability to EM. Each essay has a word limit of 1500 words including any tables, figures and headings entrants will be penalized for submissions in excess of this. Up to 2 figures/tables are allowed.

Essays must avoid any reference to any institution or anything that may reveal the author’s identity. Only one applicant can be considered per submission and applicants are not permitted to submit to both categories. The winning submission will also be considered for publication in the Emergency Medicine Journal.

Applicants must have played an important part in the relevant research/quality improvement and must have personally written the submitted work. The Awards will be determined by the Research & Publications Committee of the College of Emergency Medicine, with or without the advice of external assessors.

Applications along with a completed application form which both must be written in English should be submitted in Microsoft Word format electronically to Theo.Chiles@rcem.ac.uk by 17:00 Friday 25th February 2022.

For more information, contact:

Research Essay Prize

Dr Matt Reed, Emergency Medicine Consultant, Edinburgh on 0131 242 1340 or matthew.reed@nhslothian.scot.nhs.uk

Quality Improvement Essay Prize

Dr Edd Carlton, Emergency Medicine Consultant, Bristol on 0117 414 4985 or Ed.Carlton@nbt.nhs.uk

Application Form – available here.

+ Blue Sky Ideas Award - Clinical Studies Group

Clinical Studies Group – Blue Sky Ideas Award

Do you have a fantastic research idea you are struggling to get off the ground? This section of the clinical studies group meeting is open to all clinicians or researchers to pitch a research idea (10 slides or equivalent) to the meeting. There will be open critique and review from ED research experts and advice on potential funding streams.

We invite applicants to consider the James Lind Alliance priority setting partnership when submitting their ideas. Other research ideas are welcome for open peer and professional review.

Please submit your research on a single page in PICO format:

  • P – Patient, problem or population
  • I – Intervention
  • C – Comparison, control or comparator
  • O – Outcomes

The closing date for submission of abstracts is 23:59 on Thursday 31 October. All abstracts will be reviewed, and the top scoring ones will be shortlisted for oral presentation. Applicants will be informed about the decision on their before the Emergency Medicine Research Engagement Day on Friday 10 January 2020 (details below).

All submission forms will be discarded 3 months after the event date. The information supplied in this form will be shared with judges. Your name and email address will be kept on record for 3 years so we can contact you about the outcome of this submission and when future opportunities to submit abstracts arise. Should you wish to remove your details from our database, please email events@rcem.ac.uk

Emergency Medicine Research Engagement Day (on behalf of the Clinical Studies Group)

Event type: Live online event
Date: Friday 14 January
Price: £25
Programme: Coming soon

Abstracts: the call for abstracts will open on 12 September 2019. This includes applications for the Principal Investigator of the Year, Young Investigator of the Year and Blue Sky Ideas.

Registration: registration will open on 12 September 2019. Please click here to register your interest.

+ Young Investigator

Young Investigator Award

One of the principle remits of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM) is to advance education and research in Emergency Medicine. The Research & Publications Committee is chaired by Professor Alasdair Gray. Its remit includes research, publications and the administration of academic awards and prizes. The RCEM Clinical Studies Group was formed by the Research & Publications Committee in 2014 and makes annual awards to recognise outstanding contributions of RCEM Members and Fellows to research in Emergency Medicine.

Since its inception in 2006, the NIHR has significantly increased the scale of clinical research in the NHS, particularly through the Clinical Research Network. The enthusiastic engagement of NHS clinicians is an essential condition for sustaining and building on this success, particularly given the many competing demands on clinician time and resources. These co-branded awards will recognise outstanding contributions of NHS consultants and trainees in the conduct of clinical research in the field of Emergency Medicine. The ‘award winners 2019-20’ will be recognised by the award of a plaque and a certificate.

The winner(s) of the Young Investigator award will also be eligible for a modest financial award, which must be invested in the award holder’s future research. In addition, up to three applicants for each scheme will be named ‘outstanding contributors 2019-20′. The award winners and outstanding contributors will be asked to present a summary of their contributions to research at the Emergency Medicine Research Engagement Day on 10 January 2019 (details below). Applicants will be required to confirm that they are available to attend and make a short presentation. On top of this, the Trainee Emergency Research Network (TERN) is committed to demystifying and supporting Trainees to do research. We are therefore very excited to announce the TERN will offer the 2019-20 RCEM’s Young Investigator the opportunity to use the network to grow and share their research.

Eligibility

The award is open to both junior doctors who are pursuing a career in Emergency Medicine and consultants in Emergency Medicine who are within 5 years of obtaining their Certificate of Completion of Training (CCT). For junior doctors who do not currently hold a National Training Number in Emergency Medicine, the panel will look for evidence of commitment to pursuing a career in the specialty.

Criteria

The award will be made based on the following criteria:

  • Candidates should show evidence of an interest in becoming active in Emergency Medicine research. A record of achieving peer reviewed publications and a track record of designing and delivering research in Emergency Medicine is desirable but not essential.
  • The application must include a proposal for a research project to be undertaken. The candidate must show a clear commitment to completing that research and show evidence that it is feasible and deliverable. Desirable criteria include evidence of strong mentorship and institutional support, a proposal that is relevant to Emergency Medicine, the potential for the award to develop the academic career of the individual and to lead on to further funding, the methodological rigour demonstrated in the written proposal and oral presentation, and evidence of structured and realistic costings that represent value for money to RCEM.

Awards will be made at the discretion of the judging panel.

Applications

  • Applications should be made using the application form.
  • Applicants should note the word limit for each section of the application form.
  • Please send a completed application form plus a curriculum vitae to Holly Lyons at the contact details below.
  • Applications must be received by 23.59 on Thursday 12 November 2020. Receipt of applications will be acknowledged.
  • Applications will be assessed by a panel of representatives from the Royal College of Emergency Medicine, the NIHR Clinical Research Network and lay representatives.
  • Successful applicants will be notified before the presentation event in January (details below). We will provide feedback for unsuccessful applicants on request.

For further information, please contact Holly Lyons at events@rcem.ac.uk.

+ Principal Investigator of the Year

Principal Investigator of the Year

One of the principle remits of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM) is to advance education and research in Emergency Medicine. The Research & Publications Committee is chaired by Professor Alasdair Gray. Its remit includes research, publications and the administration of academic awards and prizes. The RCEM Clinical Studies Group was formed by the Research & Publications Committee in 2014 and makes annual awards to recognise outstanding contributions of RCEM Members and Fellows to research in Emergency Medicine.

Since its inception in 2006, the NIHR has significantly increased the scale of clinical research in the NHS, particularly through the Clinical Research Network. The enthusiastic engagement of NHS clinicians is an essential condition for sustaining and building on this success, particularly given the many competing demands on clinician time and resources. These co-branded awards will recognise outstanding contributions of NHS consultants and trainees in the conduct of clinical research in the field of Emergency Medicine. The ‘award winners 2019-20’ will be recognised by the award of a plaque and a certificate.

The winner(s) will also be eligible for a modest financial award, which must be invested in the award holder’s future research. In addition, up to three applicants for each scheme will be named ‘outstanding contributors 2019-20’. The award winners and outstanding contributors will be asked to present a summary of their contributions to research at the Emergency Medicine Research Engagement Day on 10 January 2020. Applicants will be required to confirm that they are available to attend and make a short presentation. On top of this, the Trainee Emergency Research Network (TERN) is committed to demystifying and supporting Trainees to do research. We are therefore very excited to announce the TERN will offer the 2020 RCEM’s Young Investigator the opportunity to use the network to grow and share their research.

Eligibility

Applicants must be Members or Fellows of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine. The awards are designed to recognise the contribution of research active clinicians rather than those who are already career clinical academics. Therefore, Members and Fellows who hold a substantive academic university appointment or an externally funded academic fellowship will not be eligible for this award.

Criteria

The award will be made based on the candidate’s contribution to Emergency Medicine research in the United Kingdom over the previous 12 months, including:

  • An outstanding contribution to the design, delivery, conduct and/or dissemination of research
  • An outstanding contribution to building research capacity in the specialty.

Applications

  • Applications should be made using the application form.
  • Applicants should note the word limit for each section of the application form.
  • Please send a completed application form plus a curriculum vitae to Holly Lyons at the contact details below.
  • Applications must be received by 23:59 on Thursday 12th November 2020. Receipt of applications will be acknowledged.
  • Applications will be assessed by a panel of representatives from the Royal College of Emergency Medicine, the NIHR Clinical Research Network and lay representatives.
  • Successful applicants will be notified soon after. We will provide feedback for unsuccessful applicants on request.

For further information, please contact Holly Lyons at events@rcem.ac.uk.

Back to top Back to top